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Researchers Fool Facial Recognition Logins By Making 3D Faces Based On Facebook Photos 3D Printing 

Researchers Fool Facial Recognition Logins By Making 3D Faces Based On Facebook Photos

Facial recognition softwares and security systems still want lots of progress and development particularly when recognizing people of color. A team of security analysts from the University of North Carolina has published a paper which demonstrates that technology-established security systems have lots of work to do. They’ve demonstrated that particular present security systems can be fooled by computer-made, 3D faced they created which were revealed to the systems on telephone. These 3D faces were created using pictures that were only accessible on social media websites like Facebook.
Spotting poor, mediocre, and high-quality images of one study participant’s face using publicly available Facebook photos. Credits: DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE/UNC CHAPEL HILL

Seeing mediocre, poor, and high quality pictures of one study participant’s face using Facebook pictures that are freely accessible. Credits: DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE/UNC CHAPEL HILL

The researchers gathered pictures of 20 volunteers from on-line sources – only like an electronic identity thief or a stalker would try to do. Next, they created the 3D faces of the subjects, added some facial cartoons using VR, so it seemed like they were looking at the camera changed the eyes. There were instances where they couldn’t discover even one picture revealing the entire face that is subject’s. They solved this problem by recreating the missing parts – feel, shadows and all.

Working on facial rendering to produce realistic texture. Credits: DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE/UNC CHAPEL HILL

Working on facial rendering to create realistic feel. Credits: DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE/UNC CHAPEL HILL

Some of the volunteers were security analysts and the research team could just find three or 2 low quality pictures of them online. Because the 3D faces made had shadows and could also go a little, they had the ability to deceive 4 out of 5 facial recognition logins examined with a success rate of 55% to 85%. True Cost, among the members of the research team said during presentation at Usenix security seminar:

“Some sellers — Microsoft with its Windows Hello applications — have commercial options that leverage alternative hardware. [In Hello’s instance, that hardware is Tobii’s eye tracking camera.] Nevertheless, there’s always a price-advantage to adding hardware, and hardware vendors will have to determine whether there’s enough demand from and gain for consumers to add specialized parts like structured light projectors.” or IR cameras

The process of preparing facial models for the attack. Credits: DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE/UNC CHAPEL HILL

The procedure for preparing facial models for the assault. Credits: DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE/UNC CHAPEL HILL

How can we distinction between a 3D face and a real? Well an actual face gives off infrared radiation and a system that finds it could be used for added security.

Do you use facial recognition login? Tell us what you feel after this study!

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